Daily Democracy

Vote: Has Dimitar Berbatov been a failure at Man Utd?

Bulgarian striker offers a pessimistic self assessment

Dimitar Berbatov

According to his Wikipedia entry, Dimitar Berbatov is the most prolific striker the world has ever seen, but sadly this is not the case. The Bulgarian has not threatened defences quite like he did when he wore a lillywhite shirt, and thanks to his unique “relaxed” playing style, he doesn’t earn an ‘A’ for effort in the eyes of most Utd fans (nor the players, who frequently infer that he is the laziest player at training).

Berbs has never appeared short of confidence – and his performance on Wednesday showed flashes of brilliance – but he has today been very critical of his own performances for Manchester Utd:

“In my first year I was disappointed in myself. I need to say that.

“It was a big pressure for me and maybe I failed myself. I think I wanted to prove myself to these supporters.

“You must remember, they are used to Best, Charlton, Cantona. I am just Dimitar.

“I got a number of assists, but I must score more goals.”

While Berbatov seems to suggest that his £30m price tag is an albatross around his neck, some Manchester Utd fans have jumped to his defence. Scott at ROM argues that Carlos Tevez ran around like Sonic the Hedgehog on Red Bull, but his strike rate was less impressive than Dimitar’s: the Argentinean managed one goal per 371 minutes, compared to the Bulgarian’s one goal per 282 minutes.

So, has he been a failure, or is he being a little harsh on himself? Votes and comments below, please…



1 response so far
  • Mama Apache // October 4, 2009 at 2:22 am

    “Carlos Tevez ran around like Sonic the Hedgehog on Red Bull, but his strike rate was less impressive than Dimitar’s”

    That is PRECISELY why Tevez was so much more valuable. Though he scored fractionally fewer goals, he actually ran for the ball and caused pressure, turnovers through midfield, made long runs, tackled hard, etc…you know, PLAYED SOCCER.

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